I liked how the protagonist used modern technology to solve problems …(Latest Review POJ)

This is the latest review of Pendulum of Justice on Amazon.

 

Finished this book and went out and got the second one. I liked how the protagonist used modern technology to solve problems and the political ideology was handled well and not preachy. Will be waiting for the third novel.

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Reality Stranger Than Fiction: Patent Office Sued for Deep-Sixing Patents

In Pendulum of Justice, Hank Rangar’s patent application is undermined by the evil director of the Patent Office.  This court case, eVideo v. U.S.A. (Ct. Fed. Clm. 2015), shows that the Patent Office had a secret program to deep-six certain patent applications:

 

In an interesting Section 1491 class-action, eVideo has filed a class-action lawsuit against the U.S. government asking for damages based upon the harm caused by the Patent Office’s S.A.W.S. program. The Sensitive Application Warning System (S.A.W.S) is the now-defunct U.S.P.T.O. program that gave double-top-secret scrutiny to applications designated as “sensitive.”  The Agency has – up to now – refused to identify which applications fell into the program (even to the applicants themselves), although a examiners inadvertently told applicants about the designation.

The harm here alleged is all USPTO and prosecution costs in applications after they were designated under the S.A.W.S. program. Joseph Zito is the lead attorney on the case.  (From PatentlyO)

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Hank Rangar Exposed: Excerpts, Interviews, and More

Hank Rangar Exposed

Welcome to the Hank Rangar Thriller series. This book offers a brief introduction to both novels in the series, and for our fans-some fun stuff, such as author interviews, trivia questions and a surprise bonus for foodies! The Hank Rangar novels are techno-thrillers with romance, inventions and most important- a thinking man’s hero. If you like what you see here, read the books!
We hope you enjoy the ride.

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Hank Rangar Merchandise Just in Time for CHRISTMAS

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Hank Rangar with an A!

Latest Review of Pendulum of Justice

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“I read the second book in the series first and thoroughly enjoyed it so I picked up this one as well. The author does a great job telling the story of Hank Rangar “with an A!” Halling’s books seem to focus on technology and corruption which are my two favorite topics in a book.”

Pendulum of Justice now has 61 reviews with an average rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars

Trails of Injustice Reviewed by the Walter Donway

There is no plot like that of the fearless individual in a righteous cause…

A novel we call a “thriller” can thrill on many levels: plot and action, character charisma, veracity of detail such as the technological, compelling power of theme, and even (yes, occasionally) the philosophical ideas at stake. Trails of Injustice, the second in the Hank Rangar series, succeeds at every one of those levels; for this reader, at least, it thrills “the whole man.”

Trails2Part, but only part, of that achievement comes from inherent power of the contemporary events that are the novel’s context and launching pad. In 2009, the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) cast about for a way to strike at the power of the giant Sinaloa Mexican drug cartel—especially its pipeline of guns, including high-powered rifles, from the United States. The bureau decided to allow the guns to be fed into the pipelines, not stopping them when purchased by American “straw buyers,” but letting them enter the pipeline where agents could follow them into the heart of the cartel.

“Operation Fast and Furious” was billed as a “bold new effort.” Now, it more often is dubbed the agency’s biggest debacle in decades. In the end, some 2,000 weapons ended up in the hands of Mexican criminals; crimes and not a few massacres were committed with the weapons. Long before this became known, though, ATF agents “on the ground” were in rebellion at the law breaking, cover ups (Mexico was not informed), and at Mexican—and then American ATF—agents killed with the guns that had been permitted to “go walking.”

A novel is never its setting, of course, and Trails of Injustice is not a “historical novel,” but its setting brings into play not only agents forced to “cooperate” with criminals, but deep deception and manipulation from Washington, a law enforcement attitude of ends justify means, the stunning cynicism of the anti-gun ATF leadership blaming gun dealers for the debacle, and the hot current topic of Second Amendment rights.

The novel’s prologue hurls us into the crucible of these forces when the cartel rolls into a bitterly poor Mexican town where the brave padre has been dissuading unemployed young men from turning in desperation to the cartel. The explosion of action, as always in such cases, seems too brief for its results: the corpses in the blood-spattered dust, a local missionary gunned down, and the padre, who had hidden one of the boys under his robe, soaked in his own blood. It is a touching, then appalling, and then heartbreaking scene that sets the pitch of the novel’s action and moral force.

Hank Rangar, laying low in Mexico after his first encounter (in Pendulum of Justice) with a Washington bureaucracy gone rogue, is drawn into the dangerously disintegrating ATF affair. Laura Ignacio, a young ATF agent in Mexico, learns that her partner, Danny, has been gunned down–supposedly by the cartel, but in a way that makes her hesitate to hand over Danny’s computer as the ATF is demanding. Instead, when she encounters a handsome hunk on the beach–none other than Hank Rangar, who is conducting a sophisticated technological measurement at low tide—she enlists skills to crack into Danny’s computer.

Funny things happen on the beach just before cocktail hour. Laura unknowingly has recruited a partner who is one of the computer/technological wizards of contemporary literature, but also a moral crusader who already has done mortal combat with Washington at its worst. Cocktails and dinner come (the story’s metabolism is fed by great Mexican cuisine, lovingly described), and the expected discovery of the luscious Laura’s passion, but it is the beginning of so much more.

The battle that Hank, Laura, and then other allies must fight in Trails of Injustice is guided, again and again, by Hank’s command of a bristling armamentarium of computer tools and skills. I can think of no novel that has done this with greater authenticity, intrigue, and panache since The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Hank’s is the power of the mind, the scientific, reasoning mind, against the sheer force commanded by the now-wholly-alarmed and ruthless acting director of the ATF, Kacey Miller, a pretty, power-lusting lesbian who believes that nothing, certainly not the U.S. Constitution, must stand in the way of gun control.

The action soon immigrates into the United States, focusing around Arizona, ground zero of the real Operation Fast and Furious, and in the Washington, D.C., headquarters of the ATF. The stakes increase and the desperation of the Washington forces becomes murderous when ATF tries to pin blame for the “gun walking” south of the border on a firearms manufacturer who is a friend of Rangar’s. His daughter, Abigail, becomes another ally in the battle, and a love interest of Rangar’s, driven by anger at treatment of her father but also infuriated to discover how much fun federal agents who feel above the law can have “searching” a sexy black woman pinned to the ground.

About midway through this novel, in classic thriller fashion, the action begins to accelerate because Rangar, Laura, and Abigail all are landing blows on ATF, blows where it hurts most: in anonymous releases to the media exposing the nature of the gun-walking scheme. Day by day, then hour by hour, the strikes and counter strikes are delivered by Rangar—through computes hacks, cyber-attacks, exposures, and deceptions—and ATF—by pulling out all stops on violence.

In the end, Hank and Laura must die or Kacey Miller must die. On the run across Arizona, where even hiding in the desert is not proof against ATF drones and other intel, Rangar is laying plans for his one and only fatal blow against Kacey Miller—there will be no second chance—even as he evades ATF agents, their cartel buddies, and local cops. The action never slows as the trajectories of the two adversaries hurtle toward collision.

There is no plot like that of the fearless individual in a righteous cause employing every ounce of brain power and scrap energy to fight the limitless resources of a government that has abandoned law to defend power at any price. In that sense, Trails of Injustice, like Pendulum of Justice, is a classic. As long as men anywhere will stake everything, including life itself, to defend their freedom, this will remain one of the grand themes.

In Trails of Injustice, the DK Halling author team has given that theme glorious new life in a way that a thrilling, breathless plot alone cannot. What lifts this novel above even the finest pure-action thriller are the ideas, the principles that not only drive the action but lend it a moral uplift that stirs the heart like “The Battle Hymn of the Republic.”

For Trails of Injustice is a battle fought in the way that only free men and women can fight it: with a conviction that drives heroic choices, terrible risks, and even the occasional sense of gay abandon that comes from knowing we can do no less, that this is best within us.

Buy Trails of Injustice, try not to finish it too quickly, give a thought to what it means for all of us, then tell a friend.

Pendulum of Justice: “A Great Read”

Latest 5 out of 5 Star Review on Amazon.com

 

Pendulum of Justice is a fast paced, original story about entrepreneurs and how they benefit society versus how corrupt government agencies and officials, in collusion with corporate interests that they are beholden to, use the unbridled power of over-regulation to hand out favors and enrich themselves at the same time.

The hero, Hank Rangar (that’s Ranger, but with an “a”) is an inventor and serial entrepreneur working on new technology in the field of heart surgery. A corrupt, crony arrangement between the patent office and a giant company is used to steal the invention.

The non-stop action involves a manhunt for Hank while he simultaneously seeks justice for himself and the many others who were devastated by the theft.

Hank uses his vast mental resources along with help from some good friends to give us a combination of computer genius/MacGyver/Jason Bourne action sequences to right the wrongs.

This book is hard to put down. The hero is a true good-guy, no serious flaws or gray areas. One of the best features of the book is the use of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and objectivist philosophy to show why and how much our government is out of control and how the hero’s actions are ethical in seeking justice.

Pendulum.finAll the features of the story fit together very nicely so the philosophical elements are an organic part of the whole adventure.

I recommend this book enthusiastically!

 

Timelord